You are right here. The Rematch string is part of the Info box, and as such it should be parsed correctly. (The string that contains the correct and breed/damage-specific min health requirements). This should be enough, but, I think there are also folks that aren’t using Rematch. They also should know of the type-specific min health requirements. Unfortunatly the default forms of the page don’t offer any detailed entries for the min health. They only offer one entry (for all damage types), and I always put the worst-case min health there (for pets that are weak against the expected damage type)
Nov 15 new player Hi, I started the game not long ago... questing has been fun but I must say it is a bit lonely running around in a massive map with no other players around. Is it only because no one is in the starting zone any more and the place will be more populated as I go to higher level zones? (This is coming from a Destiny player and basically every zone I go there are other players and most time at least if you emote at someone random they emote back... but in WoW it just doesn't feel social at all...) Also, I have just learned to ride a mount... is there free mounts that I can perhaps farm from enemies or do I just have to buy them from the trainer? Sorry for sounding cheap but I am not exactly swimming in gold... yet? Finally... dungeons... is it better if I start running dungeons now just to familiarize with group play in WoW or should I just keep on solo questing? I'm just worried that people will just leave the instance as soon as I say I'm new.. should I find a guild and run dungeons as a pre-made team just so I can actually learn from the experience? Otherwise I imagine people just speedrun the dungeons and I'll just end up getting completely lost... Sorry for having so many questions... there is so much to learn in this game!Wackyweasel4 Nov 15
Discipline: Premonition - Heals nearby targets within 20 yards for [ 75% of Spell Power ], and applies Atonement to yourself. Deals [ PS * BC1 ] Shadow damage to yourself for each Atonement you have active, and increases their duration by [ 5 + 0.1% of Spell Power ] sec. Holy: Rapid Mending - Prayer of Mending is now instant cast, and its jump range is increased by 10 yards. Shadow: Void Origins - Void Eruption is now instant cast. Rogue
Kaivax, a WoW forum community manager, revealed that WoW Classic's class design, battleground mechanics and stats on existing items will be set to their 1.12 state, despite the game releasing content that expands beyond that. This removes "progressive itemization," so if the stats on a specific piece of equipment was changed during the original updates, that won't take effect in this version.

So far my favorite take is, of all things, this forum thread where the sheer volume of people reporting things as bugs that aren’t bugs, but just the way the game worked back then. I think I laughed the hardest at Warrior health regeneration is working at the expected rate, which is a very nice way of saying Yes, you’re dying a lot, that’s how it was for Warriors back then. I’ve said it before and I know I’ll say it again, but guys, all those supposed ‘dumbing down’ changes that got made between then and now were for a reason, and in a lot of cases? That reason was because it’s awful. Much of WoW Classic is going to feel like getting a sandpaper massage compared to the game as it is now — a whole host of conveniences and improvements have been made over the years.
That's not to say that everyone has an unrealistic vision of what vanilla WoW was like. There were already plenty of people on the WoW Classic forums pointing out that perceived bugs are just recreations of the original game. And as noted before, a flaw to one player is a key component of the original positive experience to another. WoW Classic will surely please plenty of purists in spades. But this goes to show that it won't be for everyone who has fond memories of the game circa 2006.
If your pet's health gets too low or its attacks aren't very effective against a certain combatant, you can always switch out your current pet with another companion on your team. Only pets that are considered active (i.e., those in your three Battle Pet Slots), may be switched in and out during the battle. Once the match is over, you can always change up your active pet team, which is useful if one of your pets is low on health or dead.

On August 27, veterans and newcomers will be able to relive World of Warcraft’s epic origins as they assemble a 40-player raid to take on the fiery hazards of Molten Core; fight for their faction in the ongoing world PvP struggle between Southshore and Tarren Mill; muster a realm-wide war effort to open the gates of Ahn’Qiraj; and much more. Click HERE to see the content release plan!


Some huge (and tiny) news coming out of the PTR today, as we're finally getting some mount size adjustments for Gnomes and Tauren! This has been a long-standing issue since...well since Vanilla really, with Tauren getting stuck on doorways and a lot of the mounts for both races never looking quite right. Well, today Gnomes can catch their mount's reins for the first time and Tauren... well they might fit through some doorways. The change only applies to "normal" size mounts for Tauren, as smaller ones (like hyenas) remain unchanged. Blizzard can now also fix issues where some mounts appear too small for certain races and they're looking into it.
Dec 28, 2016 Better Living through Technology!(new2macros) *note: this guide is for people who haven't used macros or advanced keybinds and want to try. Macros are basically 'super buttons' that you can create in order to use multiple abilities and spells from the same button. This means even if you have 15 different abilities, you can key them all to 3-5 buttons. With macros you can do things like: 1) have all your buff spells on one button 2) 'hide' abilities that you don't use very often so they only show when you need them 3) 'group' similar abilities so that, for example, all your commonly used melee skills are on one button 4) maximize your rotation so that you're always one step ahead of the GCD Macros are great, but there are a few limitations: 1) complicated! -learning macros takes a good chunk of time. It's only something I've been able to do since my work gives me some 'free time' to cruise the UI/macro forum. 2) software limited -While very powerful, there is potential to abuse macros so that, for example, you could hit one button and your character would kill every mob in range (eventually). This potential for abuse has cause blizzard to put some powerful limitations on macros. More about this later. 3) the One Button rule -each macro button can use only one ability each time you press the button. You can code this so that it will use a different ability each and every time you press it (and on a different target!), but you can't press the button once and, for example, have it cast all 5 self buffs on you. I don't even know where to start?! To get started with macros, it's very simple. Just log on WoW and type /m. This brings up your macro box, where you just have to hit 'new' and the game will prompt for a name and an icon. I recommend that you leave the icon as a question mark. (?) The question mark means the game will automatically pick up the picture of the ability that the macro will use. My First Macro For your first macro lets just replace a normal ability you use on your bar in combat. I'm going to use paladin abilities here, but you can replace them with whatever ability you like. So to make my first macro, I went to the /m menu in game, picked a new macro, and gave it the question mark icon. Then I click on the icon, click on the empty box, and type: /cast This is the basic core of every macro. It's basically like the verb in a sentence. You can use different 'verbs' (called slash commands) but this is probably the most popular. Since I want this macro to cast Hammer of the Righteous, I simple type that in after the /cast. /cast Hammer of the Righteous And pow! I'm done! If you drag this onto your bar and hit it a million times, you basically have the paladin protection spec in a nutshell (lol). However this doesn't really give you any extra functionality over a normal keybind. The next thing I'm going to do is make the macro heal a friendly if I have a friendly targeted, or if it's an enemy it will use SotR (shield of the righteous). To do this you add a conditional. This says 'only cast this spell if 'X' is true.' It looks like this (with a breakdown of the macro underneath): /cast [help] Word of Glory; [harm] Shield of the Righteous \__/ \____/\__________/\/ \____/\__________________/ verb-conditional---|---separator|----------------| -------------------ability---------conditional----Ability What this macro will do is check the status of your current target. A 'friendly'(help) value will cause my paladin to heal the target. An 'enemy'(harm) value will trigger the attack ability. If you can grasp macros thus far, you've already learned enough to make macros useful for you. Putting this on your bar will basically cut the number of keybinds you need by 1. Modifier macro commands Another handy feature you can use with macros is called a Modifier. This may sound familiar but it's possible to set a macro so that it will use a different ability or spell if you hold down control, alt, or shift. Here's a basic example: /cast [mod:alt] Seal of Truth;[mod:ctrl] Blessing of Kings;[mod:shift] Righteous Fury; Seal of Insight If you had this macro bound to 1, and you press 1, it would cast Seal of truth (and the seal picture would be on the keybind). Pressin ctrl would change the icon to blessing of kings and would cast blessing of kings if you pressed ctrl-1, etc....Raygecow149 Dec 28, 2016
WoW Classic seeks to recreate the "vanilla WoW" experience—that is, WoW as it existed before a series of seven game-altering major expansion packs from 2007's The Burning Crusade to 2018's Battle for Azeroth. To achieve this, Blizzard has rebuilt the game based on archived data from back in 2005 and 2006 (patch 1.12 is the goalpost—the current game is on patch 8.1.5). The company has committed to meticulously presenting the experience exactly as it was back then—warts and all—with only a small number of unavoidable or critical changes.

Related to this, we’ve seen a lot of questions about the general invite process and want to clarify a few things. The method in which people are invited from the opt-in pool is not on a first-come-first-served basis, but instead we look at a variety of factors such as the age of the account. That said, the amount of closed beta invites that we’re sending out is rapidly decreasing as we have met our current population needs for testing. We’ll regularly reevaluate the need for additional invites as we go through the testing process.
Sep 1 Blindsight's How to Choose a Server Guide [Originally posted by Blindsight-Spirestone on the old Warcraft forums--it's my understanding he no longer posts, but this is a valuable and informative guide] Since it's a frequently asked question on these boards, I've thrown together a quick guide for how to pick a server. Server Datacentre Location - New York, Chicago, Phoenix, Los Angeles First and foremost: Limit your search to servers that are as close to you (physically) as possible. Closer servers will have better latency, and thus deliver a better play experience. WoWWiki has a great list by datacentre: http://www.wowwiki.com/US_realm_list_by_datacenter Realm Type - PvP, PvE, RP, RP-PvP Now that you know which servers to look at, the next most important question is if you want to play on a PvE, PvP, RP, or RP-PvP server. RP vs. non-RP servers should be a simple choice: when interacting with other players, do you want to act "in character" replying to other players like they're living inside the world of Azeroth, or would you rather just play WoW like any other video game treating everyone else like a player at a keyboard? If you want to play on an RP server with active RPers: "Wyrmrest Accord and Moon Guard are very popular, but Moon Guard is very over populated." -Nok PvE vs. PvP is a bit of a tougher decision. On a PvP server, once you get to about lvl 20, in just about every questing zone you go to you can be attacked at any time by any player of the opposite faction (Horde vs. Alliance). If you like the idea of jumping other players while they're running around killing mobs/questing, this may be for you. If you don't like the idea of a max lvl player killing you in 1 shot when they ride by, then you may want to stick to PvE servers. Some people feel that PvP servers have a slightly more mature community since most children and/or immature players can't stand being killed randomly. Other people feel that PvP servers have a less mature community since it's full of teenagers who like to grief other players while they're just trying to quest. YMMV. Realm population - New, Low, Medium, High, Full The next major consideration for choosing a realm is the realms' population, both the total number of players and the Alliance / Horde ratio. This is a bit more complicated, and there are different ways of looking at the data. First, WarcraftRealms.com has a tool for taking a "census" of various realms, but it relies on data uploads from players on the server. Its data is only as accurate as the data it receives from player uploads, but it gives a pretty good baseline idea: http://www.warcraftrealms.com/realmstats.php?sort=Total Another useful way to look at population data is in terms of server age. Older servers tend to have higher populations. WoWWiki has a list of all US realms' creation dates: http://www.wowwiki.com/Timeline_of_the_creation_of_US_realms So that's great, but what does it mean? How does population affect the game? Here are a few points to consider: Empty servers: By far the easiest way of ruining the MMO experience is to have nobody to play with. Avoid servers with very low population. Queues: Very high population realms often have queue times. This could mean waiting for half an hour every time you want to play during prime time. During prime time (weekday evenings and weekends), check the realm status page to see if the server is listed as full: http://www.worldofwarcraft.com/realmstatus/ Economy: Higher population realms have more robust economies. This means the auction house will have many more items listed and will be much more competitive. 10/25 Man Raid PuGs: Higher population => more things happening => more groups going all the time. Pick up Groups will form more frequently and will fill faster, meaning you can play more and sit in town waiting for groups less. This also, however, means (on some servers) that PuGs can be more picky in who they take along since anyone can be replaced quickly. A/H ratio: Depending on how you like to play, you may want an even ratio so that everything that involves opposite faction interaction (like world PvP) are more fair, or you may want to be on the advantage side of an imbalanced ratio so that your side is usually winning. The only disadvantage with being on the plus side of a wildly imbalanced population is that soon, world PvP zones (i.e. Wintergrasp) will only allow the same number of players (beyond a minimum level of 20 players) from each faction in at the same time, so if nobody from the other side shows up, only 20 from your side can get in.Frejya117 Sep 1
Some quests in my guide are marked as "SKIP" and colored in red.  These quests are simply either too hard to solo or not worth the XP/time and are skipped.  My guide will only list SKIPPED quests if the quest is a direct follow up after completing a quest, not one that you have to click the NPC again to get it.  If you hover over the skipped quests, it will give info on why it is skipped in the guide (unless that info is already listed directly in the guide text).
2. the only gear that was easily attainable sort of was the old level 60 pvp sets. if the classic servers stay locked in progression of any expansions then grinding the PvP gear for both pvp and raiding would be the top choice in casual play. "IF" they implement the LFG and LFR tools for the 16-40 man raids, heh it would be very interesting, otherwise get use to Trade chat being filled with PuG raid groups looking for people, because that was the norm back in the day.
It was the experience of the game that brought pleasure and joy, and that's what a lot of us want again. Not the numbers. When I play Classic I want to go through the deadmines with people I like and overcome a challenge together and see myself become stronger as a result. I don't want to play Classic so I can say "booyah! That number is exactly the same as it was 13 years ago!"
×